Supporting the current definition of marriage, which has served Scotland well for centuries.

Sign the marriage petition to show your support for retaining the current definition of marriage.

54,063 people have signed the petition so far

people1

One man + one woman

Marriage is the union of one man to one woman, for life, to the exclusion of all others. Although death and divorce may prevent it, it is the ideal environment for raising children. It is possible to respect the rights of others while also supporting traditional marriage.

people2

Polygamy may be next

If marriage is redefined for same-sex marriage, it could be redefined for polygamy next. Canada introduced same-sex marriage and then that was used in a court case to argue that polygamy should be made legal. Once you start unpicking the definition of marriage, it can unravel further.

people3

Free to disagree

People shouldn’t feel compelled to agree with redefining marriage just because of political correctness. And people shouldn’t be penalised just because they support traditional marriage. People's careers shouldn’t be damaged, foster parents shouldn’t be turned away, and religious adoption agencies shouldn’t be closed down just for upholding traditional marriage.

people4

Hold a referendum

This issue should be decided by the people, not by politicians. If there is to be a change it should be subject to a referendum. The Scottish Government did not invent marriage, and it does not have the moral authority to redefine it. At the very least, on an issue of this importance, MSPs should be guided by their constituents more on this issue than would normally be the case.

Petition for marriage:

This petition is restricted to those living in Scotland.





We signatories to this petition are in favour of retaining the current legal definition which has served Scotland well for centuries. We are opposed to redefining marriage in Scotland and we call for a referendum on this issue.

Marriage is the union of one man to one woman, for life, to the exclusion of all others. It is the best environment for raising children. We note that homosexual couples already have full legal rights available through civil partnerships.

We are deeply concerned about the implications for what will be taught in schools if marriage is redefined. We are also concerned that the definition of marriage may be rewritten further so that, for example, polygamy may be legalised at some future point.

Our chief concern is for the general welfare of the people of Scotland. In addition, we do not wish to see the rights of conscience eroded for those who disagree with homosexual marriage.

Employees should not face discrimination at work because they support traditional marriage, neither should parents be criticised by schools for refusing to allow their children to take part in lessons which promote same-sex marriage. Organisations and people of all religious traditions must retain their freedom to speak and act according to their religious beliefs.